Softwire Blog


6 Key Factors for Successful Sprint Planning


24 March 2017, by

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Picture this: You’re leading a talented, cohesive, high-performing team of software engineers. They work as consistently and predictably as a beating heart. Every sprint planning, you pick the next eight stories off the top of your perfectly groomed, prioritised backlog, knowing that in two weeks’ time, those eight stories will be delivered in production, and your team will be ready for eight more. Sound familiar? No?

If you’ve yet to achieve ‘scrumvana’, then your team probably has a variable throughput. This is particularly likely if you’ve got a new team, or are setting up a new project. Until you’ve had time to settle into a cadence of delivery, it can be difficult to predict how much work your team can get through in a two-week sprint. So how do you plan? How many stories do you assign to a sprint if you don’t know whether you’ll get through two or ten?

 

Plan conservatively

Start by identifying a minimal nugget of work that your team can reasonably get through, based on your team’s capacity. Even your most pessimistic team members should agree, “If we can’t get through this by the end of the sprint, something is horribly wrong.” That will give you the best chance of delivering your plan, keeping your stakeholders happy, and leaving your team with a sense of accomplishment. It also gives you an early warning system: if you can’t deliver that minimum amount by the end of the sprint, something is horribly wrong. You’ve made some bad assumptions about the project, which you need to investigate and fix.

Far more likely, you’ll get through at least that minimal amount. So what do you do with the slack?

 

Set some stretch goals

When you identify your minimal nugget of work, you should also identify a few stretch goals for the team that will keep them busy if (or more likely, when) they’re done with their main goals for the sprint. Make sure it’s clear which stories (or other tasks) are stretch goals and which are the main goals – your overall project plan shouldn’t depend on getting your stretch goals done this sprint, and your stakeholders shouldn’t be counting on them. There should be absolutely no shame in carrying them over to the next sprint if they’re not done yet. Your team should also be aware that they’re lower priority than the main goals. Stretch goals are like dessert. You’re not allowed to touch them until you’ve finished your mains.

 

Eliminate unknowns

A lot of the variation in throughput at the start of a project is because there’s so much unknown. There are problems you don’t know how to solve yet – you may not even know whether or not they’ll be problems yet. Planning in spikes in your early sprints can shed light on those unknowns to make things more predictable. Use your early spikes to test your riskiest assumptions, and also to identify and solve the problems that could slow down your first few stories. With those answers in hand, you can increase your confidence that the next sprint’s worth of work will be appropriately sized and free of blockers.

Later in the project, there will naturally be fewer unknowns, so you won’t need to do as many spikes, but you should still plan them in where appropriate throughout your project to make sure the next batch of work is sufficiently well understood. Always plan a spike with a clear set of objectives – it should be answering a specific question that will then help to refine and break down an upcoming story. Remember to factor in the time your team will spend on spikes when you’re working out your capacity for story work.

 

Keep measuring and improving

At any phase of your project, you should always be on the lookout for ways to improve. It helps to focus on whatever is the biggest challenge the team is facing at that point in time. At the beginning, variable throughput may well be a big issue. To help you improve, you may want to use a Kanban board to visualise the flow of work so you can easily see where the bottlenecks are. Keeping an eye on cycle times and then investigating what’s slowing you down (or speeding you up!) can also lead to improvement. Use data to find the root causes of variation, and work with your team to address them. Make continuous improvement a habit, so when your throughput settles down, you can tackle the next challenge.

 

What about bugs?

If your throughput is not yet stable, your flow of bugs is unlikely to be stable either. That can make it hard to predict how much capacity you should allocate for bug fixing each sprint. Again, start by planning conservatively – assume the worst and make sure you have enough capacity to fix loads of bugs if needed. You can always fill the slack with stretch goals if there aren’t as many bugs to fix.

In the meantime, work towards building quality into your stories. Shorten your feedback loops by doing things like running an automated regression suite on each commit. Avoid writing bugs in the first place by conducting good code reviews, or using pair programming. Any bugs associated with a story should be fixed or avoided as part of the process of getting that story to done. Then, bug fixing won’t be a separate process you need to plan for – planning a story will inherently include bug fixing around it.

 

What about tech debt?

Just as you may need to devote some capacity within a sprint to spikes, you may also want to devote some to resolving tech debt. Remember to time-box any investigatory work, and adjust the output you expect from your team to account for the time they’ll spend on it. Tech debt tasks should be well-defined and broken down, just as you would stories, to help you maintain your cadence. Then you can schedule those tasks into your sprint the same way you would do with stories.

 

And finally

Capacity-based sprint planning can be a useful fallback to get things going when throughput is variable. Eventually your team will settle into a more predictable cadence, making it easy to plan based on throughput alone. Make sure you keep measuring and improving so that sources of variability don’t creep back in. That way, you can keep that rhythm of delivery beating for the life of the project.

 

 

 

 

What I did on my volunteering day – Jenny


20 March 2017, by

I had the privilege of being part of the Inspire! iDiscover week at Carlton Primary School in Gospel Oak.

Volunteering at a primary school with Inspire

Inspire! are an Education Business Partnership working in Hackney, Camden and Islington. They enable young people to learn about work and gain practical experience of the skills and attributes they need for employment, in particular working with young people from less advantaged backgrounds or who are at risk of being excluded from mainstream education or who are not in education, employment or training (NEET).

iDiscover is an initiative which introduces Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers to local primary school children. The week-long programme provides schools with work-related STEM activities with the aim of encouraging more girls and non-white students to consider a career in these industries.

I was part of an afternoon session with two Year 1 classes where they get to meet real-life people working in engineering careers. Aside from me, there were people from the Institute of Engineering and Technology, an energy engineering and consultancy firm, and an architect.

Volunteering at a primary school with InspireEach of the engineers ran short sessions with the children in small groups – things like building a torch or a Lego tower. I wanted to explain to the kids what a software engineer does in really simple terms (we give instructions to computers to make them do things) so I set up a very simple Scratch project. When the children pressed specific buttons on the keyboard they could make a cat sprite move around the screen, change colour or say hello to them, and I tried to get across the message that these were all instructions I had given to the computer to make it do these things.

Although some of them had never used a computer before they all got the hang of it pretty quickly and came up with ideas for other things we could make the cat do. They’ll learn more about Scratch in the later years of primary school but for now, I was just keen for them to learn that software engineering is another type of engineering, and understand that it has something to do with playing with computers!

In summary, I would like to think that I spent my volunteering day helping some kids take a small early step towards a STEM career.

Photos by Inspire! EBP

Advanced Clean Code


15 March 2017, by

This post is a quick overview of patterns I have picked up over the years that I aim to use when coding and usually end up pointing out in code reviews.

These aren’t hard and fast rules, but to me, this post forms an extension to Uncle Bob’s clean code (which you should read right now if you haven’t already!).

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Top CIO Priorities 2017 – Infographic


1 March 2017, by

 

 

 

The many benefits of code reviews, and how to achieve them – 3. Improving the Process


8 February 2017, by

This is part of a series of blog posts on code reviews, based on two sessions of an internal discussion forum at Softwire. See the first post in this series for more information. In this post, we’ll discuss improving the interaction between the reviewer and the recipient of the review (i.e. the developer).

How do we mediate reviews?

There are all sorts of ways to mediate a review:

  • Specialist review tools like Crucible and UpSource
  • Repository systems with review features, like GitHub, GitLab, and Gerrit
  • Sending diffs/patches over email
  • Talking through the code face-to-face, e.g.
    • Have the reviewer sit with the developer at their computer
    • Reviewing code as a team around a big screen
    • The old-fashioned way: Print out the code, stick it to the wall, and scribble over it together
  • Pair-programming is arguably a form of code review, taking place as the code is written

Broadly speaking, all of the above approaches fall into two categories: asynchronous online reviews, or in-person reviews. Which kind of approach people preferred was probably the most contentious part of our discussions at Softwire. There was a range of opinions here, highlighting benefits and drawbacks to each approach.

Asynchronous online reviews vs. in-person reviews

Several people made the point that in-person reviews can be more useful for training, and for knowledge sharing in both directions. Face-to-face discussions make it easier to provide context around the code changes. They also give the developer a chance to talk the reviewer through the changes in a sensible order, or perhaps commit-by-commit. This might be better than the arbitrary order in which changes are presented by a diff/patch or an online review tool.

In-person reviews may also provide opportunities to pick up other context that might not be directly relevant to the code quality but is useful for the reviewer to know. For example, any frustrating obstacles the developer encountered while working on the task, which the team might need to address. Reviewing in-person can also save developers from context-switching. If you have enough reviewers on a team, developers can get a review as soon as they finish their code rather than starting on another task and subsequently switching back to deal with review feedback. This obviously comes at the cost of the reviewers having to make themselves highly interruptable though.

A lot of the literature on code reviews also favours some kind of in-person reviews. Here’s one particularly strongly stated example:

“Effective code reviews are not done via a tool or remotely—they are done when you’re sitting side-by-side with the person or pair who just wrote the code. This personal way allows you to share and teach much more information than you can pass in a text-based tool. Don’t skimp on this! If you’re going to do code reviews because your code sucks, do them right.” – Roy Osherove in Notes to a Software Team Leader

On the other hand, some of our reviewers felt that asynchronous online reviews were better partly because they don’t provide the reviewer any additional context. Online reviews arguably make for a more authentic review of maintainability (future developers on the project probably won’t have the luxury of talking through the code with the original developer). Also, coming at the review from their own angle might allow the reviewer to spot issues that the developer has missed.

One major advantage of online tools is that they leave a permanent record of review comments. Some tooling combinations make it particularly easy to go back through old reviews (for example, Crucible with JIRA integration). Several people had worked on projects where they had benefited from the ability to do this.

Several people found it useful to mix online and in-person approaches, perhaps depending on the nature of the change. For example:

  • Performing a high-level review in isolation first, then talking through with the developer for context, before finally performing a line-by-line review online.
  • Saving face-to-face reviews for bigger or more complex changes
  • Carrying out most of the review discussion in person, but using an online tool to track this. That is, initiating the review process and documenting any important outcomes of the discussion.

Reviewers: Making code reviews better for the developer

Quite a few people found phrasing review comments to be a challenge, especially when using online review tools. Some of our reviewers were concerned whether we did enough to make new-starters comfortable with the process, and to make it clear that they can and should challenge their reviewers. After all, the developer is always closest to the code and knows it best. It can be worth a reviewer (particularly one in a more senior position) reminding the developer of this explicitly.

Ways to make reviews more positive included:

  • Phrasing review comments as questions or suggestions rather than statements
  • Talking through major issues in person rather than writing lengthy review comments
  • Talking through and fixing batches of very minor issues in person, rather than writing lots of tiny review comments
  • Remembering to always make some positive comments (especially in reviews with some criticisms elsewhere)

This might be more or less important depending on the developer. Generally, reviewers should be conscious of the recipient of the code review and tailor things to them. Extra tact may be required when reviewing code from external third parties, which can be politically awkward.

Developers: Making code reviews better for the reviewer

This wasn’t a question we had set out to answer with our discussion. However, people naturally mentioned how they approached submitting their own work for review, and several common points arose:

  • Performing their own review of the changes first (ideally in the same review tool the reviewer will be using)
  • Linking to any relevant context (e.g. the relevant ticket in the project’s issue tracker)
  • Keeping auto-generated files out of the review (if appropriate and the review tool allows)
  • Splitting into sensible commits
    • Especially keeping big renames, file moves, or other refactorings separate
    • Also splitting code changes across multiple commits where appropriate)
    • On one project, we experimented with commiting and reviewing one test at a time, resulting in many small reviews. On a small team, this turned out to be a very effective workflow.

Summary

As we saw in the previous post, there are many different valid approaches to code reviews. Organisations should give teams the flexibility to choose a code review process that meets their needs. The first post in this series covered the wide and varied benefits of code reviews. As a team, you should reflect on your code review process, considering what value it provides and what further value it could provide. This will allow you to evolve your code review process to be more effective. I hope this series gives you some ideas that you find useful. Please feel free to share your own ideas on code reviews in the comments below.

Digital Transformation Essentials


1 February 2017, by

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Digital Transformation

 

We have met with business leaders from across the globe in diverse industries. They see the impact technology is having on their business and say, ‘We need that!’ They recognise the need to exploit digital transformation opportunities to discover new markets, find ways to do business more effectively and respond to the challenges from new entrants and movers in their sector. They realise that embracing technology will enable them to be more responsive to potential and existing customer demands. They recognise that being technically complacent will mean lost opportunities, lost market share, lost customers. But they don’t know how to go about getting the benefits that come from using technology in new and disruptive ways.

In the main, the business leaders we speak to are asking:

  • How do I create a company culture that encourages and enables exploration and experimentation whilst acknowledging and managing risk?
  • Where am I going to get the skills I need to make this happen? I have great people in my business but this is new to us.
  • How do I make sure I’m getting value for money and not just kicking off projects that will wither on the vine?
  • What benefits and ROI should I expect from digital transformation initiatives?

Below are some of our responses to these questions.

Company Culture

Think BIG. Plan BIG. Start small.

Organisationally you need to know where you want to get to, you need to have clarity on the vision you are trying to achieve, whilst being flexible about how you get there.

Core questions include

  • What do you want to achieve?
  • What will be different as a consequence?
  • How will you know its been successful?
  • How long can you take to get started?
  • When do you need to start seeing results?

Answering these questions and others will give you a strong footing for making key decisions and a reference point when it starts to get hard and you come up against challenges or resistance.

The key point: Clarity. For you, for your leadership team and for your employees. Everybody needs to know what the plan is, how it’s going to happen and how excited leadership are about the journey. And when you tell your people about it – always err on the side of over communication. Tell and tell the story about how great things are going to be. Celebrate the successes. Publish them. Share them. Make a lot of positive noise.

Once you have clarity, you need to make someone responsible for action. We recommend a key member of the executive team. The most commonly selected role type is the CTO/CDO. They can then get on with selecting their team, making their lower level plans and executing them. We recommend a cross-functional core team. The make-up of the core team will depend on your objectives but role types include accountable leader, line of business owner who is seeking change, technical architecture specialists, business process specialists and programme management. Depending on the size of the organisation some of these roles may be covered by a single person. The key at this stage is to get a plan in place and start getting stuff done.

We recommend starting small. Based on the strategic vision and objectives this team should select some key hypotheses to validate and then using experimentation techniques to understand if the hypotheses will return the expected results. To facilitate experimentation whilst managing risk, businesses should adopt rapid innovation tools such as Lean and Agile. They should also consider coupling these to a change approach such as Kaizen.

Lean and Agile approaches allow businesses to quickly validate or discard hypotheses, whilst minimising investment. Coupling them to Kaizen as an evolutionary, incremental change method allows management of significant change from existing operating models without alienating staff along the way. Used correctly this approach can create a cultural paradigm shift. Whilst some businesses will have experience of these tools and methods, where you do not, we recommend investing in training and finding a partner who can work with you to embed this capability in the organisation.

The key here is to have tools and processes for getting stuff done and Getting On With It.

I.T. Skills Shortage

Look inside and outside the organisation for talent that is both complementary and challenging

There is a current and growing IT skills shortage. At some point this is likely to have a direct impact on your ability to achieve your objectives. It’s an Elephant in the room. Adopting a cross-functional and shared services approach can address some IT shortages, but it will not help support the skills that are lacking within a business. Therefore, you need to be open to and actively seek ways to create a highly collaborative culture. To facilitate external collaboration, leaders need to seek collaboration opportunities with partners, such as Softwire. These partners should have, or be able to develop a deep understanding of your business and help design and implement digital technology solutions.

Controlling costs and generating ROI: 

Leverage legacy systems to free up investment capital. Allow for reasonable failure. Learn from it fast.

Leaders need to be clear on how they are going to invest and how they are going to measure both tangible and intangible ROI across the organisation. Digital transformation is technology driven. However it is not solely driven by the I.T. department. It crosses lines of business. It impacts ways of doing business – people, process and policy. It can succeed or fail based on the buy-in and attention given from people who are not directly I.T. staff.

Organisational silos can be a significant impediment to digital business transformation. When people are protective of their ‘turf’ or budgets this gets in the way of disruptive innovation. As already mentioned, creating cross-functional teams can reduce the negative impact of silos and this protectionism. Getting the right people hooked into the process and empowering them with clarity of purpose and confidence enables each team member to give their expertise and insight.

Adopting Lean and Agile methods means you can commit to small, incremental investments based on validating specific hypotheses – whether the outcome is learning quickly to kill an idea, or pressing the button to scale a proof of concept into a fully-fledged customer offering. The key is to keep investment small, work quickly to learn all you can and make active decisions based on evidence.

Where investment grows without checks and balances on the value, where decisions get bogged down in unnecessary bureaucracy or committees, you will eventually find a disgruntled finance executive demanding that this ‘waste of money’ be canned. So, when you have success, celebrate it. Make sure it’s shared widely and repeatedly.

We all know budgets are always tight. In most organisations the I.T. Department is seen as a cost centre, especially since 80% of an I.T. budget is generally spent on maintenance and support of legacy systems. As a consequence, we recommend leveraging existing legacy technologies and processes rather than creating new systems. That said, one of the major challenges with legacy systems is the inertia from decades of systems and processes. It’s true that the business needs to invest and maintain systems they rely on to operate. However, this is an area where budget can be freed up to aid experimentation with new technologies.  In addition, years of organic growth in legacy systems across multiple lines of business can lead to a complex matrix of technologies and processes. We suggest significant benefits are achievable from harmonising processes, in particular where customers’ have to engage with these systems.

Conclusion

There’s a battle outside ragin’, It’ll soon shake your windows, And rattle your walls, For the times they are a-changin’[i].

We are in a period of significant upheaval across the business landscape. Macro and local economic impacts are meteoric. Technology disruption and innovation impacts are seismic. Whole sectors have been decimated. Some are under attack right now. Others are seeing the early waves breaking against their shores.

We have seen traditional responses to these attacks fail.

In addition customers are much more savvy. They realise how powerful they are. They demand to engage with the business on their terms. The quality of experience and service they receive is ever more in direct proportion to the level of loyalty they are willing to give. Customer tolerance for a subpar experience is at an all-time low. We see this demonstrated in the way they move on to a new supplier almost immediately something does not suit them.

This behaviour alone is driving digital transformation, and shaking up businesses. With customers expecting an experience that is fast, efficient and simple we have to find ways of meeting their needs, or be left behind. Its little wonder business leaders are looking at leading technology companies and saying, ‘We need that!

[i] The Times They Are A-Changin’, Bob Dylan, 1964.

 

The many benefits of code reviews, and how to achieve them – 2. How do we go about code reviews?


1 February 2017, by

This is part of a series of blog posts on code reviews, based on two sessions of an internal discussion forum at Softwire. See the first post in this series for more information. In this post, we’ll cover some of our current approaches to code reviews.

We tend to at least implicitly perform code reviews in multiple passes. These break down into three stages:

  • “Outside-in” preliminary review
    • Reading through the original user story or defect
    • Reviewing the design
    • Checking out the dev branch and doing some cursory testing (this can be useful for reviewing UI issues or things that are hard to spot from the code or by automated tests)
    • Reviewing the tests at a high level (do they function as good developer documentation for the code)
  • Review of the code itself and the tests in detail
  • Review of any activities surrounding the code change, e.g.:
    • Manual testing
    • External documentation
    • Risk/impact assessment

Note that not every project needs all of these passes. The point is that “code review” is a broad term covering a range of activities. Which activities you carry out, and when, may vary by project. Although within each project, there’s a lot of value in being consistent. Consistency helps developers become comfortable with the review process, and makes code reviews a much more reliable tool for quality assurance.

When do we review

As noted above, different code review activities may be carried out at different times. There was a general consensus in our discussions that reviewing earlier is preferable. Most projects insisted on at least some form of review before commit, although a few relaxed this in special cases (depending on the type of project) to avoid becoming a bottleneck.

About half our teams are actively performing up-front High-Level Design reviews. These can be useful for everyone but especially for less experienced developers (which might just mean less experience with the particular project). They encourage working through design issues up front, avoiding wasted time at the implementation stage. It also means the code reviews can then focus on just the code. The only problem mentioned with HLD reviews was that it can be a bit unclear what we mean by an HLD, and sometimes people go too low-level. For projects broken up into well-sized tasks, an HLD could just be a couple of sentences and a few bullet points.

An alternative to up-front HLD reviews is reviewing roughly implemented code, essentially a spike or proof-of-concept. This can be particularly useful on tricky legacy codebases, where it might be hard to see how to go about introducing new functionality.

Who carries out reviews?

Most of the people in our discussions were their team’s technical lead. Unsurprisingly, tech leads were doing reviews themselves, but there was a lot of support for reviews being done by not only the tech lead. Getting more people involved in the review process is a good way to build people’s confidence, share knowledge within the team, and help people become more comfortable with the review process. One person doing all the reviews can also become a bottleneck and slow the team down. Perhaps more importantly, giving developers the autonomy to carry out genuine peer reviews is a show of faith in the team’s ability, and makes it easier for reviews to act as a positive motivator.

One problem with having multiple people involved in reviewing is that it can become confusing for developers. It’s not always clear how to pick an initial reviewer, or when a review would be considered “done”. It’s important for each team to agree on a consistent approach, although approaches can of course vary between teams. Most of our teams use one of the following approaches:

  • Let the developer choose the initial reviewer and allow the developer or the reviewer escalate to the tech lead if needed
  • Have a high-level second line review as part of the standard review process
  • Include the tech lead on every review, but allow developers to merge their changes as soon as at least one person has reviewed it. This prevents the tech lead becoming a bottleneck but still gives them a chance to go into detail on any red flags.

All the above approaches include the possibility of the tech lead acting as a second line reviewer. Our tech leads would go into more or less detail in their review based on the nature of the change and the experience of the other people involved (i.e. the original developer and reviewer). In some cases perhaps just reviewing the comments from the first-line reviewer and/or looking out for changes within common problem areas of the codebase.

How much detail to go into in a second line review is a matter of judgement and may not be obvious. It can help to think of the goal of reviewing as gaining trust that the code is up to standard, and getting involved enough to meet this goal. Of course, it’s still worth bearing in mind the importance of code reviews for training and mentoring. A second-line reviewer may be looking out for learning opportunities for both the developer and the initial reviewer. They’re also in a position to assess the quality of the interaction between these two roles. This will be the subject of the next post.

The many benefits of code reviews, and how to achieve them – 1. Introduction


25 January 2017, by

There is a lot of writing on the importance of code reviews and how to go about them at a low-level (i.e. what to look for in the code). This series of posts takes a higher-level look at how to approach code reviews and how to maximise their benefits. We’ll also refer throughout to other useful writing on code reviewing and how to make the most of it.

At Softwire, we have always carried out code reviews in one form or another. But our methods and tooling have evolved over time, and often varied between projects. This allows each project team to find a way of working that best suits them.

We recently ran couple of internal lunchtime discussion forums to talk about code reviewing and pool our collective experience. The goal here wasn’t to try and agree on “one true code review methodology”, but just to share ideas between teams. We discussed the perceived benefits and overall aims of code review, and how we go about achieving these.

It turned out that the approaches to code reviews within the company are even more varied than I’d thought. But there was some broad consensus on the benefits and aims of code reviews. However, the benefits that we valued most may surprise you.

What value do we get from code reviews?

Both of our discussions came up with a similar consensus on the range of benefits provided by code reviews. In rough order of their prominence in the discussions, these were:

  • Training and mentoring
    • In fact, several people felt that the healthiest approach to code reviewing was to treat it as a training opportunity first
  • Knowledge sharing
    • In both directions (i.e. both the developer and the reviewer had opportunities to learn from one another)
    • This includes sharing domain knowledge, general technical knowledge, and knowledge of the specific codebase
  • Encouraging people to produce better work (knowing that it will be scrutinised by your peers)
  • Keeping the codebase consistent, in terms of style and structure
  • More generally, keeping the codebase maintainable
  • Catching defects, or at least catching them earlier (and so making them cheaper to fix)

One point I found interesting here was that “catching defects” was one of the last points to come up, in both discussions. There was a lot more emphasis on the holistic benefits of code review: training, knowledge sharing, and improving the overall codebase.

Quality assurance is the main focus of some widely-referenced sources on code reviewing. For example, Jeff Atwood’s blog post Code Reviews: Just Do It, and the two books that it references (Peer Reviews in Software and Code Complete). These mainly focus on reducing errors/defects/bugs, and only briefly mention other benefits. Of course, improving defect detection is not a bad argument for doing code reviews. Perhaps it’s also the most persuasive one in organisations that don’t have a history of doing code reviews and are reluctant to let people start spending time on it.

Defect detection is a valuable and somewhat measurable benefit, which may make it a good angle to sell the idea of doing code reviews at all. However, for the developers and tech leads who actually carry out code review, it doesn’t need to be the only aim or even the primary aim of the exercise. So how do we go about code reviews at Softwire? We’ll cover this in the next post.

Top five technology trends for 2017


20 January 2017, by

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With so many new buzzwords and technologies, it is hard to determine which of these actually hold any clout in the modern business arena or have what it takes to become part of our lives in the future. Whilst we don’t profess to have all the answers here at Softwire, here are the top five trends that we believe will make a real impact in 2017.
Virtual Reality

We predict that VR will continue to be one of the most significant developments in the technology space this year. VR has the potential to complement and improve daily activities.  Facebook has marked its space in this arena and we are likely to see VR-related upgrades from the leading social media players. Social media channels are one of the best routes for pushing the boundaries of this technology. Products including Google Daydream Viewer and  Samsung VR have increased the level of content for consumers to digest and we’re likely to see this with games, movies, TV series and possibly gigs.

 

Augmented Reality

With the overwhelming success of games like Pokemon Go, brands now see the huge potential of this technology. It’s taken stampedes of people in parks, racing to catch their next Pikachu to make anyone pay attention. We predict that 2017 will see consumers less apprehensive of accepting AR on their smartphones and devices. In fact, with many of the shocks the world has faced in 2016, perhaps it may offer a more appealing ‘reality‘ whilst not completely detaching us from the outside world.

Following its recent upgrade, Microsoft’s mixed reality platform, ‘Windows Holographic’,  now promises a varied new set of reality experiences for Windows users. Apple could make a play for a seat at the table with AR offerings. Who knows, Magic Leap may even start shipping at some point later this year (well, maybe…).

Where AR surpasses its counterpart, VR, is in its hardware simplicity. There is no need to purchase additional complimentary hardware, there’s a much easier gateway to the experience – a mobile device. AR has the potential to enhance existing games, toys, work and retail and we’re excited to see what comes next.

 

Artificial Intelligence

During 2016, AI has developed significantly and as a result machine learning has become more universally understood. Consumers have benefited from the increased choice of digital voice assistants and it’s likely that many big players will see 2017 as an opportunity to take advantage of consumers’ understanding and appreciation of this growing tech trend.

With Google’s Assistant, and Amazon’s Echo marketing themselves as must-haves in the home, we could see champions such as Microsoft and Apple releasing their own respective Cortana and Siri-based competitive devices.  AI will continue to grow smarter and smarter.

 

Screen Technology

We will take advantage of some of the emerging tech,  AR and VR, on 4K screens and on smartphones. Yes, smartphones.  HDTV technology is old news, curved screens and 3D just aren’t hitting the right buttons. Creating bigger and bigger TVs will not win any innovation prizes. Why is this one of our top trends? We believe that the manufacturing tides of transformation are turning towards the smaller screens, specifically those we have at our constant disposal.

We have seen OLED (organic light-emitting diode display) technology rise to become the flagship technology for smartphone screens. This year we’re likely to see the technology leveraged to help create thinner and more battery-efficient smartphones.

Why is this important? Why should anyone care? Will anyone ever really notice? Consumers are becoming more familiar with slipping their smartphones into their VR headset of choice.

With the screen so close, only higher resolutions can deliver the best experiences.

 

Security and Privacy

With the growth in artificial intelligence and IoT devices security is a key question.  We will have thousands of connect devices, all communicating via the cloud, using real-time monitoring, logging, and data analytics – data on us. Security gaps with unpatched IoT devices could lead to significant compromises more damaging than previously thought.  In order for these technologies to move forward security and privacy issues need to be taken seriously.

 

We will be closely monitoring these trends during 2017 and delivering bespoke digital solutions to our valued clients, to find out more read our blog.

 

 

A quick guide to javascript streams


16 January 2017, by

In this short article, I’ll lead you through a crash course on what a stream is, and how you can harness them to make your code more understandable.

If you want to try out any of the examples here, they will work with the excellent library bacon.js.

So what is a stream?

A stream is a sequence of objects, but unlike other sequences, it’s handled lazily (so the items aren’t retrieved until they’re required). This means that unlike a normal List, it doesn’t have to be finitely long.

You can put anything in your stream characters, numbers or even user events (like keystrokes or mouse presses). Once you’ve got your sequence, you can manipulate it in lots of different ways.

Streams can also completely remove the requirement to think about time, meaning fewer race conditions and therefore more declarative code. This removal of the need to represent time in code also results in architecture diagrams which are easy to draw and reason about.

Manipulating your stream

Now that we know the purpose of a stream, how do we manipulate it? What follows is a selection of functions that can be called on streams along with visual representations of the effect of these functions when called. It should provide everything needed to set up and use some programs which utilise streams.

map(f)

Map takes a function f. Then, for every item that appears in the stream, it applies the function f to it and produces a new stream with the new values.

scan(f)

Scan takes a function f. Then for each value in the stream, applies the function to the previous result along with the current value. This is similar to fold, but the output is a stream of all the values rather than just the final value, which fold would provide.

filter(f)

Filter takes a function f, then for each value computes the function, and if it evaluates to true, puts the value into the output stream, else discards the value.

merge

There are several ways to combine two streams. Using merge will take values from both streams and output values (in the order they are received) into the output stream.

This differs from concat, which takes two streams and returns all of the first stream before returning all of the second stream.

sampledBy(f)

SampledBy takes a function f and two streams (A and B). The function f is then called whenever a value is provided by stream A, passing in the last value from each stream. In the example below, a value is created in the output stream whenever a value occurs in the top stream. The output is then created from the value in the bottom stream.

slidingWindow(n)

SlidingWindow takes an integer n and returns the last n values from the stream as an array each time a new value occurs in the input stream.

Stream Summary

So in summary, you can use stream functions to manipulate streams in a multitude of different ways. You should use streams to remove the time component from code, allowing for simpler to understand and debug code.

This post first appeared on Chris Arnott’s blog.