Women in Tech: What more could be done

By Zoe Cunningham
Posted on 9 April 2019

There has been a lot of discussion around the reasons behind the gender gap in the technology industry, but when it comes to being proactive and changing the way they operate, often businesses can fall short. Not every organisation wants to prioritise balancing the gender split within their team, despite knowing that gender and ethnic diversity correlates with profitability. But for businesses who do want to see the benefits and believe in improving the landscape, there are some steps they should be taking.

Accentuate the Positive

67% of women believe that making a positive impact on their organisation is the best thing about being a woman in tech. Making a difference means different things to different people, but a good place to start is by introducing Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Pro-bono and volunteering initiatives can make a huge difference when it comes to making people feel as though they are making a difference. CSR is often looked at as a revenue drain but it’s simply not the case. Whilst giving back to other causes, the knowledge base of the team expands and makes them feel more positive about their roles. Allowing people to take the time to make a difference both internally and externally benefits the bottom line in the long run. Recruitment costs reduce through retention, the skills learned advance business abilities, and like-minded customers will want to support your business over those who don’t share these values.

Level the Playing Field

Last year The State of Wage Inequality in the Workplace report found that 66% of the time women in tech asked for less pay than their male counterparts, leaving them with 6% less salary. It’s not just women who feel the impact of this gap, men have also reported that knowing there is a gender pay gap within a company would have a negative effect on their opinion of that organisation. Therefore, eliminating any gender pay gap is not just about levelling the playing field for the sake of your female employees, it’s about positioning your business as an ethical, responsible organisation that all employees can feel proud to work for.

 Show, Don’t Tell

If you can’t see someone who looks like you doing the job, then you don’t think it’s for you. In fact, 20% of women would leave a job if there wasn’t enough female representation. Considering this, promoting the role of women in the sector through staff stories is one of the strongest steps a company can take. Organisations should be helping their employees recognise what they have to offer and encouraging them to share their story by networking, applying for guest speaker slots or entering them for awards. There are now a number of events dedicated to recognising the women in the tech sector such as TechWomen 100, Women in Tech Awards and Women in Tech London, all showcasing the achievements and possibilities for women in tech.

Want to know what inspired some of our female team members to join the tech sector? Check out our podcast.

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